Halifax, since 1999
April 12 is Halifax Day, although weirdly enough in North Carolina and not in Halifax. The four arrows represent the four former municipalities that were merged into the Halifax Regional Municipality in 1996.

Halifax, since 1999

April 12 is Halifax Day, although weirdly enough in North Carolina and not in Halifax. The four arrows represent the four former municipalities that were merged into the Halifax Regional Municipality in 1996.

How Canada became home to some of the world's more visually stunning — and fun — heraldry

Not quite flag related, but this is a great article on the excellent work done by the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

Cape Breton Island
This is one of several unofficial flags, but it’s the most common one you’ll find on the island. 

Cape Breton Island

This is one of several unofficial flags, but it’s the most common one you’ll find on the island. 

Canada, since 1965
John Ross Matheson died this past December at the age of 96. He’s often been called the father of the Canadian Flag, and with good reason. He was the one that massaged George Stanley’s flag proposal into its current form, enlarging the centre stripe and adding an evelen-pointed maple leaf drawn by Jacques St-Cyr. He was also responsible for underhandedly shepherding the flag through Parliament’s selection committee. His hard work paid off when the flag was proclaimed on 28 January 1965.
Alistair B. Fraser recounted the full story in his excellent free ebook on the Flags of Canada, and it’s well worth a read if you’ve got the time.
(designers: George Stanley, John Ross Matheson, Jacques St-Cyr)

Canada, since 1965

John Ross Matheson died this past December at the age of 96. He’s often been called the father of the Canadian Flag, and with good reason. He was the one that massaged George Stanley’s flag proposal into its current form, enlarging the centre stripe and adding an evelen-pointed maple leaf drawn by Jacques St-Cyr. He was also responsible for underhandedly shepherding the flag through Parliament’s selection committee. His hard work paid off when the flag was proclaimed on 28 January 1965.

Alistair B. Fraser recounted the full story in his excellent free ebook on the Flags of Canada, and it’s well worth a read if you’ve got the time.

(designers: George Stanley, John Ross Matheson, Jacques St-Cyr)

ottawadailypics:

Anthem time before the @Senators and @FlaPanthers game at the Canadian Tire Centre @CdnTireCtr

ottawadailypics:

Anthem time before the @Senators and @FlaPanthers game at the Canadian Tire Centre @CdnTireCtr

Hamilton, since 2003
A “Canadian pale” is a flag with three vertical stripes, the centre one being one half the total width of the flag. Ideally the flag should have a 1:2 ratio so the centre stripe can be a square. As the name would suggest it’s a popular design in Canada, first used on the national flag. (A pale, by the way, is the heraldic name for a vertical stripe.)
Hamilton got its Canadian pale after amalgamating with the five other municipalities in Hamilton-Wentworth. It’s a bit unique in that the central stripe is a darker colour rather than a lighter one. The cinquefoil in the centre is the symbol of Clan Hamilton and the circular chain with six large links represents the six former cities and towns.
(designer: Ralph Spence)

Hamilton, since 2003

A “Canadian pale” is a flag with three vertical stripes, the centre one being one half the total width of the flag. Ideally the flag should have a 1:2 ratio so the centre stripe can be a square. As the name would suggest it’s a popular design in Canada, first used on the national flag. (A pale, by the way, is the heraldic name for a vertical stripe.)

Hamilton got its Canadian pale after amalgamating with the five other municipalities in Hamilton-Wentworth. It’s a bit unique in that the central stripe is a darker colour rather than a lighter one. The cinquefoil in the centre is the symbol of Clan Hamilton and the circular chain with six large links represents the six former cities and towns.

(designer: Ralph Spence)

Anglican Church of Canada, 1955 (proposed, top); since 1955 (bottom)

If you’re going to make a flag for the Anglican Church of Canada, it pretty much has to be a combination of the English flag and a maple leaf. The question is, how exactly do you combine them? The sub-committee charged with designing the flag wanted a single gold maple leaf in the centre of the cross. When the General Synod approved the flag later that year it put maple leaves in the four corners instead, and made them green to indicate that their church was “youthful and vigorous”.

scavenger-mind:

Normandy 2013

l-ttl:

Canadian Pride

Nikon D7000 with Nikkor AF-S 70-200 F/4G ED VR lens

Canada (proposed), 1963
The mast majority of Canadian flag proposals had a maple leaf on them somewhere, but once in a while a designer would take a more abstract approach. This proposal in Canadian Art had a blue and red circle on a white field. It’s meaning hasn’t made its way to the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada, but If I had to guess I’d say it has something to do with English and French Canada. Or maybe the designer just liked Japan.

Canada (proposed), 1963

The mast majority of Canadian flag proposals had a maple leaf on them somewhere, but once in a while a designer would take a more abstract approach. This proposal in Canadian Art had a blue and red circle on a white field. It’s meaning hasn’t made its way to the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada, but If I had to guess I’d say it has something to do with English and French Canada. Or maybe the designer just liked Japan.

Nunatsiavut, since 2003
Nunatsiavut is an autonomous Inuit region in northern Labrador, not to be confused with the nearby the territory of Nunavut. Like Nunavut, Nunatsiavut has an inukshuk on its flag. It’s rendered in the white, green, and blue of Labrador’s flag.
I’ve always thought this flag looks a bit funny. Almost like the individual rocks have a “waving flag” effect drawn on top of them or something.

Nunatsiavut, since 2003

Nunatsiavut is an autonomous Inuit region in northern Labrador, not to be confused with the nearby the territory of Nunavut. Like Nunavut, Nunatsiavut has an inukshuk on its flag. It’s rendered in the white, green, and blue of Labrador’s flag.

I’ve always thought this flag looks a bit funny. Almost like the individual rocks have a “waving flag” effect drawn on top of them or something.

Tlicho, since 2005
The Tlicho are a First Nations people living in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Their autonomous government, established by the 2005 Tlicho Agreement, manages an area nearly as big as Switzerland with just 3000 residents.
They’ve got a great flag up their, and you can see a bunch of pictures of it on their government website. The four tents on the flag represent the four Tlicho communities. The sun and the waves represent the words of the Chief Monfwi when he signed Treaty No. 11:

This sun that rises, if it does not go back on itself, this Great River that flows, if it does not flow back on itself, on this land, we will not be restricted from our way of life.
For as long as this land shall last, it will be exactly as I have said.

The proper way to spell their name, by the way, is Tłı̨chǫ. Count yourself lucky if your computer rendered that properly.

Tlicho, since 2005

The Tlicho are a First Nations people living in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Their autonomous government, established by the 2005 Tlicho Agreement, manages an area nearly as big as Switzerland with just 3000 residents.

They’ve got a great flag up their, and you can see a bunch of pictures of it on their government website. The four tents on the flag represent the four Tlicho communities. The sun and the waves represent the words of the Chief Monfwi when he signed Treaty No. 11:

This sun that rises, if it does not go back on itself, this Great River that flows, if it does not flow back on itself, on this land, we will not be restricted from our way of life.

For as long as this land shall last, it will be exactly as I have said.

The proper way to spell their name, by the way, is Tłı̨chǫ. Count yourself lucky if your computer rendered that properly.