1. emmapap-spoof:

    August 2014.

    You can see on these pennants an echo of Greece’s old dual flag system, where the plain cross was for internal use and the cross with stripes was for external use.

     
  2. Manabí, since 2007

    The flag of this Ecuadorean province has a somewhat unusual composition. Arcs of stars are pretty standard, but they aren’t usually spread over multiple stripes or put next to a triangle like this. The whole thing just feels weirdly asymmetrical and unbalanced.

    There are some images online that show the stars in a circle instead of an arc. That would make a lot more sense, but the version with the arc seems way more common, even when you discard the renderings on FOTW and Wikipedia.

     
  3. georgepericles:

    Rwaniro Flag - designed by @georgepericles #rwanda #flag #africa #branding #culture #rwot

    Oh sweet they actually got some printed. This Rwandan heraldry project is amazing and well worth checking out. Rwanda already has a great national flag but they’d be able to set themselves apart even more if they adopted this proposal.

     
  4. Tegucigalpa

    What an odd little wonderland of a coat of arms this city has. It’s got a very atypical frame. Very floral and colourful and ornate. Got the little angel on her tippy-toes and everything.

     
  5. The Royal Bhutan Police beneath their flag (middle) and the national flag (right).

     
  6. Leiva

    I guess LEIVA is the Colombian equivalent of those LOVE/HATE knuckle tattoos. That outstretched hand is supposed to represent hospitality, but honestly it just kinda looks like it’s juggling those stars.

     
  7. kropotkindersurprise:

    October 12 2014 - Violent clashes erupted in Santiago on Sunday after a 5,000-strong group of Mapuche and members of other indigenous communities marched through the Chilean capital to demand greater autonomy and respect for indigenous regions.

     
  8. Alaska, 1927 proposal

    Benny Benson, thirteen-year-old designer of the Alaska state flag, was only one of several schoolchildren that entered the contest. This cute little flag was proposed by one Mary Walsh, also thirteen. (I’ve digitized and cleaned up the original hand-drawn entry, but all the elements are in the same place.) 

    Some of the other entries are preserved in this document from the Alaska State Museum. You can see a really interesting range of ideas here. None of them as good as the actual flag, of course.

    (designer: Mary Walsh)

     
  9. napoleondidthat:

    Napoleon’s flag on the Isle of Elba

    source

     
  10. Kalmykia, 1992-1993

    Kalmykia is one of the few republics in the Russian Federation to have changed its flag since it was established. The original version was a tricolour based on the flag of the Don Cossacks. The symbol in the centre apparently means “Kalmyk” in the old Mongolian script.

    (designer: P. Bitkeevym)

     
  11. stormbornvalkyrie:

    House Stark “Winter is coming.”

    The Starks look for courage and loyalty and honor in the men they choose to serve them.

     
  12. San Juan de Betulia

    This flag appears to depict the world’s most awkward handshake.

     
  13. (Source: ummagumma-)

     
  14. North Yemen, 1962-1990

    When revolutionaries in North Yemen overthrew the Mutawakkilite monarchy, they took as their flag a version of the United Arab Republic tricolour with only one star. Much like the three-star flag adopted by Iraq a year later, it symbolized a hope to eventually join the union.

    But the UAR by this time had already effectively fallen apart, and the only union that ever took place was the one between North and South Yemen in 1990. When that new republic was created the star was dropped from the flag, leaving only the tricolour.

     
  15. andywarnercomics:

    Hey there. You can go read my comic on flag design on Re:Form design magazine. That may sound like the most boring thing ever, but you’re wrong, dammit. The piece has Czars disguised as shipbuilders, shattered Central American empires, revolting Dutch, perfidious British and fancy Welsh.

    Go read it.

    Bonus fun fact: the study of flags is called “vexillology.

    This is pretty great. Go read it!